The Google Cloud ….

Google’s vision of the Cloud seems to be based on the idea of having highly scalable compute nodes that run a framework based on BigTable.  It requires using Python as a language. I was hoping to see Google make its Search Engine, Translation, Google Maps  and all the other functionality available as a service.   The features offered in the Google AppEngine are quite powerful- Some very good websites have been built using the GoogleApp Engine- and they are showcased here.

It offers a DataStore,  MemCache, Mail ,  URLFetch and Images as a service.  This is an impressive set of services.  However,  what if every Google service was made available as a Web Service? One could then compose- “mashups” out of the powerful features Google has.   For example,  one could take “News”  about Venezuela and have it translated in   Spanish, inlcude images and maps, as well as share this using a specially created website.

The number of transactions per second seems quite limited- according to some users. (This is not confirmed. )

“Compared to other scalable hosting services such as Amazon EC2, App Engine provides more infrastructure to make it easy to write scalable applications, but can only run a limited range of applications designed for that infrastructure.

App Engine’s infrastructure removes many of the system administration and development challenges of building applications to scale to millions of hits. Google handles deploying code to a cluster, database sharding, monitoring, failover, and launching application instances as necessary.

While other services let users install and configure nearly any *NIX compatible software, AppEngine requires developers to use Python as the programming language and a limited set of APIs. Current APIs allow storing and retrieving data from a BigTable non-relational database; making HTTP requests; sending e-mail; manipulating images; and caching. Most existing Web applications can’t run on App Engine without modification, because they require a relational database.

Per-day and per-minute quotas restrict bandwidth and CPU use, number of requests served, number of concurrent requests, and calls to the various APIs, and individual requests are terminated if they take more than 30 seconds or return more than 10MB of data.  ”

Overall, the vision of this Framework as a public Cloud did not seem very clear. On Amazon EC2,  one can create an infrastructure that has  a relational database and an application server.  It is therefore possible to be treat Amazon EC2 as just the base Infrastructure, and build sophisticated services on top of it.   This does not seem to be supported by Google at the moment.

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